Category Archives: Bible-Theology

Sermon: No Dry Trees

The gospel, the good news for all of us, is that we serve a “single” Savior! Jesus never married a human woman, never had biological children. Yet according to Isaiah 53:10, as a reward for his perfect obedience, his Father gave him “many offspring,” and “prolonged his days”! Jesus showed us that the lasting impact of God’s work in our lives is not that we have biological children, but that we would have many spiritual sons and daughters—people whom we have invited into God’s family by faith, and discipled. Continue reading

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Special Service: Worshipping with the Fifth Gospel

Jess Smoker and I did an independent study on the Book of Isaiah that semester. We discovered that we are both musical, and decided that one of her assignments should be for us to craft a worship service structured around songs from Isaiah, and short teachings from the passages on which those songs are based. Continue reading

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My Journey to Affirming the Ordination of Women (Part X)

One important objection of complementarians to the evangelical egalitarian position is the observation that in the last century-and-a-half, Christian groups that have embraced women’s ordination have embraced other doctrines and practices that they believe are unscriptural–most notably, acceptance of homosexual practice, and the sign gifts (tongues and prophecy). This is a slippery-slope argument, but rhetorically effective and important to consider. Continue reading

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Sermon: A Personal Encounter

A sermon delivered at LCC’s International Christian Fellowship on November 12 entitled, “A Personal Encounter.” The text was Psalm 73. Continue reading

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Sermon: New Family, New Temple

This is the audio (20:00, 18.4 MB) of a sermon delivered at a chapel service at LCC on October 11 entitled, “New Family, New Temple.” The text was Ephesians 2:11-22, part of a series of sermons on Ephesians entitled, “A New World Order.” Continue reading

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Review in JSOT

Cat Quine’s review of Sit At My Right Hand has been published in the Journal for the Study of the Old Testament‘s review issue.

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Review of “Sit At My Right Hand” in RBL

Leslie C. Allen has reviewed my book over at the Review of Biblical Literature. Continue reading

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My Journey to Affirming the Ordination of Women (Part IX)

All branches of the church until relatively recently (the last century-and-a-half), and sizable branches of the global church today (Roman Catholic Church, Eastern Orthodox and Oriental Orthodox Churches, many conservative Protestants) did not ordain women. I am a confessional Protestant, not a biblicist. The historic interpretation of Scripture in the church carries significant weight in my assessment. It was therefore difficult to accept the notion that both the Eastern and Western churches were wrong on this for so long, and that the Roman, Eastern and Oriental churches are still wrong. Continue reading

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Give Us Our Daily Feed

I’ve written before about the free audio education I received over eight years working in pharma while in seminary and grad school. I thought it would be interesting to share what’s in my podcast feed, and solicit suggestions for new audio food for thought. What do you listen to, and why? Continue reading

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Sermon: The Good Samarians

One way to look at this story is to say: Look how bad Judah became, look at the effects of idolatry and self-love in this society! Even though we have this moment of repentance, obedience and mercy shown by Israel, it wasn’t enough to save that nation from destruction, either. (It’s like getting to the end of the book of Jonah—and realizing that God eventually destroyed Assyria for rebellion.) While this is true on some level, I don’t think it’s the way that the Chronicler wants us to read the story.
I believe that the positive way that the Chronicler wants us to look at it is: No matter how far is the human descent into sin and depravity—and it is far!—God is present. He is willing to descend into that darkness to rescue his people. In this story, it takes the form of a prophet, Oded, who probably wasn’t listened to much of the time! But God was present there. And God was present in the Chronicler’s day, as well—despite the fact that a Persian Emperor ruled over God’s people, not the chosen descendant of David. Continue reading

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